02 Identifying the challenges for the translation profession

23 Apr

LouisAs I said in my introductory post, I see the translation services sector as consisting of two distinct parts, i.e. the original ‘profession’ on the one hand, and the relatively recent arrival of the ‘industry’ on the other.
The ‘industry’ is essentially a supply chain created and controlled by agencies, brokers and middlemen, who have inserted themselves between the professional translator and the client.  Because of their position in the supply chain (direct relationship with the client), and because of a number of other reasons discussed below, they are increasingly able to exploit the profession, thereby causing the profession’s rapid decline in prosperity, and possibly its eventual destruction.
Killing the goose that lays the golden eggs and winding up with a duck that lays rocks 🙂

This would not have happened, of course, unless there were reasons for it to occur.
The main reasons, as I see it, are:

(1) the rapid growth of global trade and the advent of the Internet in particular, which has meant that many clients need to have their documentation and their internet sites translated into a wide range of languages at the one time, exceeding the limits and capacity of most self-employed professionals and small professional practices who handle a limited number of languages they are able to guarantee in terms of quality;

(2) the profession has failed to differentiate itself from the industry, making it difficult for a potential client to separate a professional translator from a para-professional, or even an amateur or indeed a fraud.  This has led them to hire agencies/middlemen/brokers to make the choice on their behalf, being unaware that this may not be a good decision these days;

(3) the rise of CAT tools, making relatively routine translation projects easier to manage, with paraprofessionals to handle most of the work; and last but not least,

(4) the establishment of internet auction sites like ProZ, the TranslatorsCafe and others, which have provided agencies, brokers and middlemen with a system that allows them to offer ‘professional translation services’ they cannot perform themselves, and to recruit free-lance translators (casual,contract workers) to do the work for them.  The sites allows them to list their projects and recruit translators through a blind auction system, driving down translation rates to what is in most cases an unsustainable level already.  The fact that this also drives down quality standards is yet to be discovered by many of the end clients, but time will tell.

There are no doubt other, less significant reasons, and though they are not essential for the purpose of my arguments, I am happy to hear them if they are relevant.
It is not my intention to deal with the ‘industry’, the supply chain issues or those willing to work within the supply chain; that is a problem for those who have a stake in the ‘industry’.

My focus will be on the ‘translation profession’ and how to slow down and hopefully reverse its decline by differentiating it from the ‘industry’ and by developing the strategies needed to succeed as a professional translator/practice.  This will include what I believe needs to be done to allow end clients to find the reliable, high-quality advice and services they often require (and do not get any more from  agencies/middlemen competing with each other on price), and to ensure that translation professionals can survive and prosper as the sector matures and the inevitable fall-out occurs.

I intend to do this by developing a strategic framework that can be used by most if not all self-employed, professional translators and small professional practices (owned by qualified language professionals guaranteeing the work), starting with a vision of what the future of the profession could be, based on what can and needs to be achieved to be successful.

So watch this space and read Blog 03.

For more details about my professional profile, go to: www.doubledutch.com.au

One Response to “02 Identifying the challenges for the translation profession”

  1. Federica April 26, 2013 at 10:53 pm #

    What an excellent article, I am looking forward to your proposals.

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